What is HPV? What are the types of cancers caused by HPV? Learn about the options for screening, treatment & management of HPV-related cancers,
What is HPV? What are the types of cancers caused by HPV? Learn about the options for screening, treatment & management of HPV-related cancers,

By Malla Reddy Narayana on 17 Aug, 2022

The only place you need to refer to get updates on latest medical events ,We at Malla Reddy Narayana Bring these updates to help you protect yourself and your loved ones.

A fairly prevalent STD is the human papillomavirus (HPV). Most of the time, the HPV heals on its own without any special treatment. However, a subset of HPV known as high-risk HPV has been linked to specific cancers.

Can An HPV infection lead to cancer?

Infection with HPV and cancer are indeed connected. Cancer can develop from specific human papillomavirus types. According to estimates, 8 out of 10 people will contract HPV at some point in their lives. But keep in mind that most people have no idea they have HPV, as it typically has no symptoms in females. One does not necessarily get cancer just because they have HPV.

 

HPV is the principal cause of cervical cancer. The majority of vulvar, vaginal, penis, and anus cancers are also brought on by HPV infection. But compared to cervical cancer, these cancers are considerably less common.

Some throat and mouth cancers are also more likely to develop when HPV is present. To determine how and to what extent HPV causes these malignancies, research is currently ongoing.

Cancer cannot be contracted directly, however, HPV, which is spread from person to person, can raise the possibility of cancer. Most of the time, the infection is cleared by the body without any negative effects.

There are countless variations of HPV. Some varieties have an impact on the mouth, throat, and genitalia. 13 or so “high risk” HPV subtypes have been linked to cancer. Long-term carriers of “high risk” HPV strains are more likely to go on to develop cancer. Men are more likely than women to develop genital warts, which can also infect women with HPV.

 

Other body parts can also be affected by some HPV kinds, including the hands and feet. These can result in minor issues like verrucas and skin warts.

During sex, HPV travels from person to person on the skin. The virus may remain dormant on the skin all around the vaginal region. Any kind of sexual contact, particularly skin-to-skin genital touch, makes it easy for it to spread from one person to another. Although it doesn’t provide full protection, using a condom or another barrier method of contraception may lower your chance of HPV infection.

How HPV infections spread and what causes HPV in females, we don’t fully understand. The HPV virus can spread via other routes besides sexual contact, despite this ease of transmission. The virus may occasionally remain dormant in the body, according to theory. After HPV infection, this could last for weeks, months, or even years. 

 

An HPV vaccine can aid in preventing HPV infection. Two or three injections are often administered over the course of many months. Your immune system is strengthened by the vaccine while it works to prevent HPV. This lessens the possibility of malignancies brought on by HPV. If you currently have an HPV infection, vaccines cannot treat or cure it.

The HPV infection cannot be cured with medication. The immune system will typically spontaneously eliminate the virus in most persons.

If cervical or anal screening tests reveal that you have HPV, you might be given the option of continuing to be screened. If you have aberrant cell alterations, a treatment to eliminate or eradicate these cells may be suggested.

FAQs

1) How do you get HPV cancer?

HPV is mostly transmitted through sexual contact, and the majority of people become infected with HPV shortly after beginning sexual activity. More than 90% of them finally recover from the virus. Those living with HIV are six times more likely than women without HIV to get cervical cancer. Malla Reddy Narayana Cancer Hospital & Research Institute in Suraram, near Jeedimetla, Kompally in Hyderabad, offers complete and affordable treatments for all types of HPV-related cancers.

 

2) What are the signs of HPV cancer?

Premalignant lesions in the body may cause symptoms such as itching or bleeding. In addition, if an HPV infection progresses to cancer, cancer may cause symptoms such as bleeding, discomfort, or swollen glands. At Malla Reddy Narayana Cancer Hospital & Research Institute in Suraram, near Jeedimetla, Kompally in Hyderabad our expert team of Oncologists specialises in surgical & radiational treatment of all types of HPV infections & HPV cancers in females & males.

 

3) What happens if you test positive for HPV infection?

If you have a positive HPV test, your doctor has found one or more high-risk strains of the virus on your cervix during a Pap test. If you have the virus for a long time, it might trigger cell alterations that can lead to several types of cancer. Malla Reddy Narayana Cancer Hospital & Research Institute in Suraram, near Jeedimetla, Kompally in Hyderabad offers comprehensive treatment for all types of HPV infections & HPV cancers. 

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